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Gynecology & Laparoscopy Surgery

Gynecologic laparoscopy is an alternative to open surgery. It uses a laparoscope to look inside your pelvic area. Open surgery often requires a large incision.

Hysterectomy

Hysterectomy

Hysterectomy is a major surgical procedure in which the uterus is removed. Many women choose hysterectomy to definitively resolve their fibroid symptoms. After hysterectomy, menstrual bleeding stops, pelvic pressure is relieved, frequent urination improves and new fibroids cannot grow. A woman can no longer become pregnant after a hysterectomy. The ovaries are not necessarily removed during a hysterectomy. Generally, if a woman is in menopause or close to menopause, the ovaries are removed. The ovaries may also be removed if they look abnormal or if the patient wants to decrease her chance of developing ovarian cancer later in life.

There are several hyterectomy surgical approaches: a vaginal hysterectomy, an abdominal hysterectomy and a laparoscopic hysterectomy. The choice of procedure will depend on the size of the uterus and several other factors.

Hysteroscopy

Hysteroscopy

Hysterectomy involves removal of the uterus. It is a permanent solution to uterine fibroids, but is associated with non-negligible mortality, and substantial morbidity with procedure-specific adverse effects and those associated with major surgery. Hysterectomy may lead to long-term psychological effects – depression and self-perceived loss of femininity. It takes some months to recover completely and return to normal activities. Hysterectomy rules out the possibility of future pregnancy, an important consideration given the peak incidence of UF in the 40-44 year age group and the social trend to postpone child-bearing.

Hysteroscopy should not be attempted if a woman is pregnant or has an active pelvic infection. It should also not be performed in women who have uterine or cervical cancer. In addition, obstruction (stenosis) of the cervical opening may make it difficult or impossible to perform hysteroscopy.

Sterilization

Sterilization

Surgical sterilization is a safe, highly effective, permanent, and convenient form of contraception. The most common surgical sterilization procedure for women is called a tubal ligation or having the "tubes tied." The fallopian tubes are the passageway for the egg to travel from the ovary to the uterus. This is where the egg becomes fertilized by the male's sperm prior to traveling to the uterus. In tubal sterilization, the fallopian tubes are either cut and separated or they are sealed shut. This prevents the egg and sperm from meeting and thus prevents pregnancy.

Endometriosis

Endometriosis

The endometrium is the tissue that lines the inside of the womb (uterus). Endometriosis can cause painful periods, persistent pain in the pelvic area, infertility, and other symptoms. The symptoms can range from mild to severe. Treatment options include painkillers, hormone treatments, and surgery. Endometriosis is a condition where endometrial tissue is found outside the uterus. It is 'trapped' in the pelvic area and lower tummy (abdomen) and, rarely, in other areas in the body.

There is no cure for endometriosis, but treatment can help with pain and infertility. Treatment depends on how severe your symptoms are and whether you want to get pregnant. If you have pain only, hormone therapy to lower your body's estrogen levels will shrink the implants and may reduce pain. If you want to become pregnant, having surgery, infertility treatment, or both may help.

Uterine Fibroids

Uterine Fibroids

Uterine fibroids or myomas are a type of benign tumor stemming from muscle layers of the womb caused due to heredity or hormonal imbalance. They can interfere with pregnancy & cause heavy & painful menstruation, discomfort. In obese women they are more prone to multiply & lead to leiomyosarcoma.

Uterine Fibroid Symptoms :

Most fibroids don’t cause symptoms—only 10 to 20 percent of women who have fibroids require treatment. Depending on size, location and number of fibroids, they may cause: Heavy, prolonged menstrual periods and unusual monthly bleeding, sometimes with clots; this can lead to anemia, Pelvic pain and pressure, Pain in the back and legs, Pain during sexual intercourse, Bladder pressure leading to a frequent urge to urinate.

Ovarian Cysts or Tumors

Ovarian Cysts or Tumors

An ultrasound or a CT scan aids in detecting ovarian cysts that occur as tiny sacs containing fluids or semi-solids that cause pain & abnormal bleeding in the vagina. Although most of them are not cancerous, timely medical treatment or surgery is quintessential for a woman’s holistic health.

The ovaries are part of the female reproductive system. They are located in the lower abdomen on both sides of the uterus. Women have two ovaries that produce eggs, as well as the hormones estrogen and progesterone. An ultrasound or a CT scan aids in detecting ovarian cysts that occur as tiny sacs containing fluids or semi-solids that cause pain & abnormal bleeding in the vagina. Although most of them are not cancerous, timely medical treatment or surgery is quintessential for a woman’s holistic health.

Ectopic Pregnancy

Ectopic Pregnancy

An ectopic pregnancy occurs when a fertilized egg implants somewhere other than the main cavity of the uterus. Pregnancy begins with a fertilized egg. Normally, the fertilized egg attaches itself to the lining of the uterus.

An ectopic pregnancy most often occurs in one of the tubes that carry eggs from the ovaries to the uterus (fallopian tubes). This type of ectopic pregnancy is known as a tubal pregnancy. In some cases, however, an ectopic pregnancy occurs in the abdominal cavity, ovary or neck of the uterus (cervix).

An ectopic pregnancy can't proceed normally. The fertilized egg can't survive, and the growing tissue might destroy various maternal structures. Left untreated, life-threatening blood loss is possible. Early treatment of an ectopic pregnancy can help preserve the chance for future healthy pregnancies.

Pelvic Abscess

Pelvic Abscess

An abscess is a localised collection of pus contained within a cavity. Pus is a mixture of dead and dying inflammatory cells called neutrophils, combined with special protein fluids secreted by cells to try and kill of bugs. Abscesses contain dead tissue in the centre and are surrounded by a fibrous capsule or case. This capsule ensures that the infection cannot spread to other parts of the body. However, it can be difficult to treat abscesses because antibiotics also have trouble crossing this fibrous layer. Abscesses can occur virtually anywhere within the body but only those occurring within the abdomen are discussed in this article. These often contain a mixture of bacteria which means they can be harder to treat. The most common organism involved is the bacteria called Bacteroides fragilis which makes up a small percentage of the normal bowel flora. Intra-abdominal abscesses often develop secondary to peritonitis an infection of the serous membranes lining the abdominal organs and walls.

Ovarian Cysts Removal

Ovarian Cysts Removal

Ovarian cysts are fluid-filled sacs (pockets) that can grow inside or on the surface of your ovaries. They are usually removed using a surgical procedure called laparoscopy (keyhole surgery), but you may need open surgery.

Ovarian cysts are common in women of childbearing age. Most ovarian cysts are harmless and go away on their own. However, you may need surgery to remove a cyst if you have one that’s causing you pain or discomfort, or if it may be cancerous.